Editor's Update

VASCULAR DISEASE MANAGEMENT

Editor’s Update*

August 2014, Vol. 11, No. 8

 

ORIGINAL RESEARCH

The Impact of a Vascular Learning Management System on Surgical Trainee Education

Anahita Dua, MD1; Sapan S. Desai, MD2

From 1University of Texas-Houston, Center for Translational Injury Research and 2Duke University Medical Center

Abstract

Introduction: This study aimed to determine the impact of an online, structured learning management system (LMS) on the learning of vascular surgical trainees by comparing qualifying examination performance with and without LMS utilization. Method: The vascular LMS course, inclusive of an online curriculum, peer-reviewed textbook, and 717 board-style vascular practice questions with explanations, was created in 2010. This course was made available to vascular trainees nationally as a preparation tool for the written vascular surgery board examination between 2011 and 2012. Following completion of the board exams, all participating trainees were invited to participate in a survey to determine the impact the vascular LMS had on their examination outcome. Statistical analysis was conducted via descriptive statistics and Pearson Chi-square with P<.05 deemed statistically significant. Results: Over a 2-year period (2011-2012), a total of 148 vascular surgeons participated in the online vascular surgery review course of which 32 (22%) participated in the survey to determine board score outcomes of the cohort. Of the 32 respondents, 18 (58%) completed the entire online review course, while 14 (45%) did not. 94% (17) of the surgeons who completed the course passed their written exam compared with only 61% (8) who did not complete the course (P<.05). Performance in the review course correlated with perceived difficulty of the written board exam (r2=.81). Conclusion: Vascular surgeons who complete a robust online program are over 10 times more likely to pass their exam compared to those who do not prepare in a similar manner.

 

CASE REPORT

Ocelot With Wildcat in a Complicated Superficial Femoral Artery Chronic Total Occlusion

Soundos K. Moualla, MD, FACC, FSCAI; Richard R. Heuser, MD, FACC, FACP, FESC, FSCAI

From Phoenix Heart Center, Phoenix, Arizona.

Abstract

Of the population of patients with symptomatic peripheral vascular disease (PVD), 40% have lower-extremity peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Chronic total occlusions (CTOs) are a challenge to vascular specialists, particularly when the lesions are calcified, long, and associated with poor distal run-off. These challenges often contribute to failure of percutaneous revascularization, and they often require surgical interventions, which are risky in high-risk operable candidates. A host of new devices is available on the market aimed at increasing the ability of operators to successfully open the chronic occlusions percutaneously and reduce the need for surgical interventions in very high-risk patient populations. All devices have their advantages, disadvantages, and limitations. We present a case of long left SFA chronic occlusion in a very high-risk operable candidate that was successfully recanalized utilizing the Ocelot and Wildcat CTO crossing devices (Avinger).

 

INTERVIEW

A Comprehensive Approach to Critical Limb Ischemia: An Interview With Carlos Mena, MD

Interview by Jennifer Ford

 

* Articles are subject to change at the editor’s discretion. 

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Editor's Update

VASCULAR DISEASE MANAGEMENT

Editor’s Update*

August 2014, Vol. 11, No. 8

 

ORIGINAL RESEARCH

The Impact of a Vascular Learning Management System on Surgical Trainee Education

Anahita Dua, MD1; Sapan S. Desai, MD2

From 1University of Texas-Houston, Center for Translational Injury Research and 2Duke University Medical Center

Abstract

Introduction: This study aimed to determine the impact of an online, structured learning management system (LMS) on the learning of vascular surgical trainees by comparing qualifying examination performance with and without LMS utilization. Method: The vascular LMS course, inclusive of an online curriculum, peer-reviewed textbook, and 717 board-style vascular practice questions with explanations, was created in 2010. This course was made available to vascular trainees nationally as a preparation tool for the written vascular surgery board examination between 2011 and 2012. Following completion of the board exams, all participating trainees were invited to participate in a survey to determine the impact the vascular LMS had on their examination outcome. Statistical analysis was conducted via descriptive statistics and Pearson Chi-square with P<.05 deemed statistically significant. Results: Over a 2-year period (2011-2012), a total of 148 vascular surgeons participated in the online vascular surgery review course of which 32 (22%) participated in the survey to determine board score outcomes of the cohort. Of the 32 respondents, 18 (58%) completed the entire online review course, while 14 (45%) did not. 94% (17) of the surgeons who completed the course passed their written exam compared with only 61% (8) who did not complete the course (P<.05). Performance in the review course correlated with perceived difficulty of the written board exam (r2=.81). Conclusion: Vascular surgeons who complete a robust online program are over 10 times more likely to pass their exam compared to those who do not prepare in a similar manner.

 

CASE REPORT

Ocelot With Wildcat in a Complicated Superficial Femoral Artery Chronic Total Occlusion

Soundos K. Moualla, MD, FACC, FSCAI; Richard R. Heuser, MD, FACC, FACP, FESC, FSCAI

From Phoenix Heart Center, Phoenix, Arizona.

Abstract

Of the population of patients with symptomatic peripheral vascular disease (PVD), 40% have lower-extremity peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Chronic total occlusions (CTOs) are a challenge to vascular specialists, particularly when the lesions are calcified, long, and associated with poor distal run-off. These challenges often contribute to failure of percutaneous revascularization, and they often require surgical interventions, which are risky in high-risk operable candidates. A host of new devices is available on the market aimed at increasing the ability of operators to successfully open the chronic occlusions percutaneously and reduce the need for surgical interventions in very high-risk patient populations. All devices have their advantages, disadvantages, and limitations. We present a case of long left SFA chronic occlusion in a very high-risk operable candidate that was successfully recanalized utilizing the Ocelot and Wildcat CTO crossing devices (Avinger).

 

INTERVIEW

A Comprehensive Approach to Critical Limb Ischemia: An Interview With Carlos Mena, MD

Interview by Jennifer Ford

 

* Articles are subject to change at the editor’s discretion. 

Back to top